Budapest, 1931
Budapest, 1931
Derrière La Gare Saint-Lazare, 1932
Derrière La Gare Saint-Lazare, 1932
La Villette, near Paris, 1932
La Villette, near Paris, 1932
Hyères, France, 1932
Hyères, France, 1932
Alicante, Spain, 1932
Alicante, Spain, 1932
Allée du Prado, Marseille, 1932
Allée du Prado, Marseille, 1932
Brussels, 1932
Brussels, 1932
Valencia, 1933
Valencia, 1933
Andalusia, 1933
Andalusia, 1933
Cordoba, Spain, 1933
Cordoba, Spain, 1933
Seville, Spain, 1933
Seville, Spain, 1933
Seville, Spain, 1933
Seville, Spain, 1933
Trieste, Italy, 1933
Trieste, Italy, 1933
Salerno, Italy, 1933
Salerno, Italy, 1933
Coronation of King George VI, Trafalgar Square, London, 1937
Coronation of King George VI, Trafalgar Square, London, 1937
A bridal pair at a café on the Marne, Jainville-le-Pont, 1938
A bridal pair at a café on the Marne, Jainville-le-Pont, 1938
Picnic on the Banks of the Marne, 1938
Picnic on the Banks of the Marne, 1938
Cardinal Pacelli, Montmartre, Paris, 1938
Cardinal Pacelli, Montmartre, Paris, 1938
Gestapo Informer Recognized by a Woman She Had Denounced, Deportation Camp, Dessau, Germany, 1945
Gestapo Informer Recognized by a Woman She Had Denounced, Deportation Camp, Dessau, Germany, 1945
Heatwave on the Boston Common, 1947
Heatwave on the Boston Common, 1947
Truman Capote, 1947
Truman Capote, 1947
Refugee Camp, Punjab, India, 1947
Refugee Camp, Punjab, India, 1947
Srinagar, Kashmir, 1948
Srinagar, Kashmir, 1948
Hundreds of Chinese nationalist recruits massing for the New Army Day parade in the Forbidden City during the waning days of the Chinese Revolution, Beijing, China, 1948
Hundreds of Chinese nationalist recruits massing for the New Army Day parade in the Forbidden City during the waning days of the Chinese Revolution, Beijing, China, 1948
China, 1949
China, 1949
A eunuch of the imperial court of the last dynasty, Peking, 1949
A eunuch of the imperial court of the last dynasty, Peking, 1949
Distribution of gold in the last days of the Kuomintang, Shanghai, China, 1949
Distribution of gold in the last days of the Kuomintang, Shanghai, China, 1949
Picnic, Georgian Republic, 1950s
Picnic, Georgian Republic, 1950s
Ile de la Cité, Paris, 1953
Ile de la Cité, Paris, 1953
Firewood, Christmas Eve, Scanno, Italy, 1953
Firewood, Christmas Eve, Scanno, Italy, 1953
On the Banks of the Seine, France, 1955
On the Banks of the Seine, France, 1955
A member of the French Academy on his way to Notre-Dame, c. 1955
A member of the French Academy on his way to Notre-Dame, c. 1955
Intermission Time at Glyndebourne, 1955
Intermission Time at Glyndebourne, 1955
At Curragh Racecourse, near Dublin, Ireland, 1955
At Curragh Racecourse, near Dublin, Ireland, 1955
At the Rodeo, USA, c. 1957
At the Rodeo, USA, c. 1957
Break, Softball Game, USA, c. 1957
Break, Softball Game, USA, c. 1957
Cocktail Hour, USA, 1957
Cocktail Hour, USA, 1957
Reception, USA, c. 1957
Reception, USA, c. 1957
Scene in the American South, c. 1957
Scene in the American South, c. 1957
Soda Fountain, USA, c. 1957
Soda Fountain, USA, c. 1957
Soda Fountain, USA, c. 1957
Soda Fountain, USA, c. 1957
The Phone Call, USA, c. 1957
The Phone Call, USA, c. 1957
At the Vélodrome d'Hiver, Paris, 1957
At the Vélodrome d'Hiver, Paris, 1957
At the Vélodrome d'Hiver, Paris, 1957
At the Vélodrome d'Hiver, Paris, 1957
Pilgrimage, Lourdes, 1958
Pilgrimage, Lourdes, 1958
Alberto Giacometti in his studio, c. 1960
Alberto Giacometti in his studio, c. 1960
Lord and Lady Mountbatten, India, c. 1960
Lord and Lady Mountbatten, India, c. 1960
An Early Scene, The first sight of Marilyn Monroe moviegoers will have when they see "The Misfits," 1960
An Early Scene, The first sight of Marilyn Monroe moviegoers will have when they see "The Misfits," 1960
Marilyn Monroe and Kevin McCarthy on the set of "The Misfits," 1960
Marilyn Monroe and Kevin McCarthy on the set of "The Misfits," 1960
Naples, 1960
Naples, 1960
Attorney General Robert Kennedy in his office, Washington, DC, 1961
Attorney General Robert Kennedy in his office, Washington, DC, 1961
Dr. Martin Luther King, Ebenezer Baptist Church, Atlanta, 1961
Dr. Martin Luther King, Ebenezer Baptist Church, Atlanta, 1961
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dlkcollection.blogspot.com

April 7, 2009

JTF (just the facts): A total of 49 vintage/early gelatin silver prints, framed in black and matted, and hung in the main gallery space. The prints range in size from 7x9 and 8x10 to oversized exhibition prints at approximately 14x22. The images come from the period 1931 to 1961, and were taken in far flung locations all over the world. (Installation shots at right.)

Comments/Context: The photography of Henri Cartier-Bresson has been so thoroughly studied and documented, it seems unlikely that there are many new paths for exploration of his art open for adventurous souls. Cartier-Bresson is of course known as the master of the hand-held camera (a 35mm Leica) and perhaps the father of photojournalism. He was the founder of Magnum Photos and the coiner of the now hackneyed (but still relevant) phrase "the decisive moment". His influence on photographers downstream from him has been nothing short of immense.

So the show of early prints at Edwynn Houk doesn't even try to add to the mountain of pre-existing Cartier-Bresson scholarship (there is no wall text, no chronological grouping, no narrative or curatorial viewpoint), and seems satisfied to have simply gathered such a remarkable group of greatest hits. Given the scarcity of vintage prints of any of his images, much less the most famous images from his entire career, this exhibit must have required many years of relentless legwork to put together.

The durability of Cartier-Bresson's images is the primary takeaway for me from this show. Many of these pictures have become so famous that they have become almost overexposed, like a song you've heard too many times. And yet, seeing many of these old favorites again in this show, many with the soft patina of age, they still seem fresh and alive, regardless of when they were taken. The second highlight (given the structure of this show) is of course his remarkable consistency. Across decades of time and vast differences in geography and subject matter, he repeatedly captured pictures of people that continue to resonate as being somehow both universal and unique at the same time. Wandering through this gallery is like coming upon a group of old friends, each one still a joy, and with news to tell.

The Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson website can be found here. His page at Magnum Photos is here.

Collector's POV: The images in this show are priced between $9500 and $90000, with two prints "price on request". Cartier-Bresson's prints are ubiquitous at auction (literally hundreds in any given year), but nearly all are later prints, and many are of more random documentary subjects, beyond his most famous pictures. While Cartier-Bresson's pictures don't fit into our particular collecting framework, it seems unlikely that so many superior quality prints will be brought together in one place again for a very long time, so put this show on your list to see before it closes.

Rating: ** (two stars) VERY GOOD (rating system described here)

Henri Cartier-Bresson, Early Prints
Through May 2nd

Edwynn Houk Gallery
745 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10151

Download PDF (266 K)

Henri Cartier-Bresson

Early Prints


March 12 - May 2, 2009
New York

Edwynn Houk Gallery is pleased to announce a groundbreaking exhibition of over 50 photographs by the legendary Henri Cartier-Bresson. This is the first gallery show of Cartier-Bresson's work to consist exclusively of vintage and early prints, which are exceedingly rare. The exhibition is drawn from a number of private collections, including the family of the artist. The works cover the sweep of Cartier-Bresson's multi-decade international career, starting with the young artist's travels in Mexico, Spain, Italy, and his native France in the 1930s, continuing through China and India in the late 1940s, and concluding with his rarely seen photographs of the United States in the 1950s-60s.

The exhibition will be on view from 12 March 2009 through 30 April 2009.

Originally trained as a painter in the studio of the Cubist artist and sculptor André Lhote, Henri Cartier-Bresson turned to photography out of frustration with his early painting. Inspired by his interaction with young members of the Surrealist movement at the Café Cyrano in Paris, Cartier-Bresson recognized photography's ability to "trap life," and to "fix eternity in an instant." In 1932, at the age of twenty-four, Henri Cartier-Bresson acquired a hand-held Leica camera, a tool that would accompany him for the rest of his career. The Leica became an "extension of his eye" and enabled the artist to combat the "formal and unnatural behavior" of those who were aware of being photographed. The compact size of the Leica allowed Cartier-Bresson to break down any distinction "between living and working" and developed into a stealth companion for recording his new photographic experiments.

From 1932-34, Cartier-Bresson traveled in Italy, Spain, and Mexico, seeking out the world of the "dispossessed, the marginal, and the illicit," a world far from his bourgeois Paris upbringing, but a world which he eagerly accepted as his own: "I prowled the streets all day, feeling very strung-up and ready to pounce, to preserve life in the act of living." Visually, this seminal period in Cartier-Bresson's career fused both Surrealist and Cubist technique. As early as 1938, a reviewer in Time Magazine described Cartier-Bresson's work as "magical" and possessing a "hidden and poetic truth." Peter Galassi, writing in his introduction to Henri Cartier-Bresson: Early Work, states that Cartier-Bresson's pre-War photographs possess the "unpredictable psychic force of straight photography" while simultaneously depicting the "street as an arena of adventure and fantasy only thinly disguised by the veneer of daily routine."

Cartier-Bresson's first published photojournalist assignment featured the crowds gathered to witness the coronation of King George VI of England in 1937. He later joined the French Army as a Corporal in the Film and Photo unit when World War II broke out in September 1939. During the Battle of France, Cartier-Bresson was taken prisoner by German soldiers and spent 35 months in Nazi POW camps. His first two attempts at escape failed, serving stints in solitary confinement as punishment. A third and final attempt was successful, with the artist hiding on a farm in Touraine before obtaining false papers allowing him to travel freely in occupied France.

Following the war in 1947, Henri Cartier-Bresson founded the Magnum Photo Agency along with Robert Capa, David Seymour, and George Rodger. A picture agency owned collectively by its members, Magnum was defined by Cartier-Bresson as "a community of thought, a shared human quality, a curiosity about what is going on in the world, a respect for what is going on and a desire to transcribe it visually." Splitting coverage of the globe amongst its founding members, Cartier-Bresson was dispatched to the Far East to report from India and China. Between 1948-1950, Cartier-Bresson received international recognition for his coverage of the final stages of the Chinese Civil War and the assassination of Mahatma Ghandi.

In 1952, Henri Cartier-Bresson published his first book, the influential Images á la sauvette, with cover illustration by Henri Matisse. In his 4,500-word preface to the book, Cartier-Bresson quoted the 17th Century Cardinal de Retz, ""Il n'y a rien dans ce monde qui n'ait un moment decisif" ("There is nothing in this world that does not have a decisive moment"). Dick Simon, of Simon & Schuster titled the United States edition of the book, The Decisive Moment, which developed into a way of seeing forever associated with the artist.

In several different trips to the United States in the mid 50's and 60's, Henri Cartier-Bresson photographed notable portrait subjects: Malcolm X, Marilyn Monroe, Truman Capote, Richard Nixon, and William Faulkner, amongst others.

Henri Cartier-Bresson was first exhibited in 1933 at the Julien Levy Gallery in New York. He has been the subject of major exhibitions at the Museum of Modern Art and the International Center of Photography, New York, The Art Institute of Chicago, the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, Galerie Beyeler, Basel, and the Bibliothèque Nationale and the Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson, Paris. Henri Cartier-Bresson passed away in 2004 in Montjustin, France at the age of 94.

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