Tent-Camera Image on Ground: Rooftop View of the Brooklyn Bridge, Brooklyn Side, 2011
Tent-Camera Image on Ground: Rooftop View of the Brooklyn Bridge, Brooklyn Side, 2011
Camera Obscura Image of the Philadelphia Museum of Art East Entrance in Gallery with a de Chirico Painting, 2005
Camera Obscura Image of the Philadelphia Museum of Art East Entrance in Gallery with a de Chirico Painting, 2005
Camera Obscura of Central Park Looking North, Winter 2013
Camera Obscura of Central Park Looking North, Winter 2013
Camera Obscura of Central Park Looking North, Spring 2010
Camera Obscura of Central Park Looking North, Spring 2010
Tent-Camera Image on Ground: View of the Grand Canyon from Trailview Overlook
Tent-Camera Image on Ground: View of the Grand Canyon from Trailview Overlook
Camera Obscura of Santa Maria della Salute Inside Palazzo Livingroom, Venice, Italy 2006
Camera Obscura of Santa Maria della Salute Inside Palazzo Livingroom, Venice, Italy 2006
Camera Obscura: View of the High Line from 23rd Street Looking North in Room with Books, 2011
Camera Obscura: View of the High Line from 23rd Street Looking North in Room with Books, 2011
Camera Obscura: View in a Second Floor Room with Vases, Pingyao, China, 2009
Camera Obscura: View in a Second Floor Room with Vases, Pingyao, China, 2009
Camera Obscura: View of the Manhattan Bridge – April 30th / Morning, 2010
Camera Obscura: View of the Manhattan Bridge – April 30th / Morning, 2010
Camera Obscura: View of the Roman Form in City Hall Office, 2010
Camera Obscura: View of the Roman Form in City Hall Office, 2010
Camera Obscura: View of Times Square in Hotel Room, 2010
Camera Obscura: View of Times Square in Hotel Room, 2010
All Detail
Previous
 / 
Next

Series

View

Exhibitions

View
Abelardo Morell: Some Recent Pictures
October 23 - December 20, 2014
Abelardo Morell
May 16 - August 29, 2013

Press

View

Abelardo Morell in National Geographic: Capturing Dreams

October 4, 2013

"Artists, the good ones, tend to re-create the world for us." -Abelardo Morell



For the full article and a video interview with Abe, please visit National Geographic's website.

Download PDF (6.9 MB)

Abelard Morell on The New York Times' Lens Blog

October 1, 2013

Converting a room into a huge camera obscura — a centuries-old optical technique that predates the pinhole camera — he took eight-hour exposures of interiors where the outside world was projected onto the walls. The results — as in the Times Square cityscape rich with kinetic detail that he did for The New York Times Magazine — were stunning and surreal. They combined the expanse of the street with the monastic quiet of a small, darkened space.


For the full article please visit The New York Times website.

Abelardo Morell featured in The Financial Times.

September, 28, 2013

The Piazzetta San Marco in Venice is projected across the walls and furnishings of an office space overlooking the square. Employing the alchemy of optics, the exterior is married with the interior, and an image of visual surprise and wonder reminiscent of a renaissance painting is created.



For the full article please visit The Financial Times' website.

Art in America on Abelardo Morell

September 13, 2013

Given the millions of photographs taken since the invention of the medium more than 150 years ago—with millions more flooding the Internet every day—any possibility of creating genuinely fresh, distinctive, let alone memorable imagery seems impossible. Yet that is what Abelardo Morell has done, steering clear of high-tech razzle-dazzle and delving into the very essence—and continuing mystery—of photography itself.

For the full article please visit Art in America's website.

Abelardo Morell on Wired

September 6, 2013

After three hours of laying completely still, waiting for his film camera’s long exposure to complete its eight-hour run in a darkened room, Abelardo Morell started to have nightmarish hallucinations. He eventually fell asleep, but his restlessness ruined the photo anyway. That’s when he decided some of his photos would work fine without him as a subject.


For the full article please visit Wired's website.

Publications

View

Abelardo Morell

American, b Havana 1948

Edwynn Houk Gallery is delighted to announce the exclusive representation of Abelardo Morell (American, b Havana 1948), whose pictures transform and transcend the ordinary and everyday. Morell has been the subject of a major retrospective exhibition, “The Universe Next Door,” which started at the Art Institute of Chicago in June of 2013, toured to the Getty Museum, Los Angeles, and ended at the High Museum in Atlanta in May of 2014. Morell’s first exhibition at Houk Gallery was at the Zürich space in June of 2013.

Always intrigued with optics and how an image is constructed, Morell began his photographic career within the most steadfast of genres, the still life. His pared down images focused resolutely on simple, everyday items: a glass bottle, a page within a book, a child’s toy. In 1991, Morell, wanting to illustrate to his students the basic tenet of photography – light passing through an aperture and its projected image – stumbled upon what proved to be a turning point; Morell realized with his image “Light Bulb,” that any room, any space can be turned into a camera. Renowned for his camera obscura works, Morell has over the years perfected the technique and continues to use what is fundamentally one of the oldest, most primitive ways to make an image.

The passage of time and capturing it in a photograph has long fascinated Morell. In the beginning, his camera obscura photographs required exposures of several hours, but now with digital technology, it is much faster. He is able to show specific times of day in single images, moments can be pinpointed instead of hours passing. Morell deftly balances a philosophical approach with a scientific rigor, and honoring a Modernist tradition, he continues to experiment, creating collages, cliché verre on glass, and for his camera obscura works, adapting a tent so that he can take the images outdoors. The effects of these images hark back to Impressionist painting where famous vistas are juxtaposed with unexpected, nontraditional surfaces, a marriage of two outdoor realities.

Morell lives and works in Boston. He studied at Bowdoin College and holds an MFA from Yale University, and an honorary doctorate from Bowdoin. In 1993, he was the winner of a Guggenheim Fellowship. Until 2009, he was a professor of photography at Massachusetts College of Art. Morell was the subject of a documentary film, “Shadow of the House,” in 2007. There are numerous publications and monographs on his work, including his illustration of Alice in Wonderland and ‘Book of Books,’ with an introduction by author Nicholson Baker. He was the recipient of the International Center of Photography’s Infinity Award in 2011. His work is in numerous private and public collections, including the Art Institute of Chicago, the Fondation Cartier, Paris, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Victoria & Albert Museum, London, and the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Detail Image